Posts Tagged ‘local search

04
Oct
11

Content for the Sake of Content… or?

Content, content, content. Blah, blah, blah. That’s all you hear in SEO circles these days. Content content content content.

Well, then, let’s all just get us some of that! Lots and lots of it.

Um, okay, what if we wrote every damn thing we could think of when we launched the site two years ago? Now what? Just make some stuff up? But that’s not likely to lead to quality content, which is the where the trouble starts.

Say I’m an entertainment news site. No problem! Content just sort of oozes up out of the ground around us. How about a site selling seasonal stuff? Great! Just pick a holiday and roll with it. But just imagine for moment that your site is more like a yellow pages ad, three pages and a contact form. Maybe you’re a roofing company in an area with lots of competition. You want to—you really need to—show up at the top of the local search for “roofers.”

Is content the right tactic?

And if it is, just what the hell are you supposed to write about?

Let’s break it down.

Sites that absolutely need to worry about a continuous stream of high-quality content:

  • Wide-market websites in competitive topic spaces (non-geographical retailers, b-to-b businesses, or sites that are advertising-supported like recipe sites, magazines, or comparison shopping)
  • Sites in rapidly evolving topic spaces (news sites, product review sites, entertainment sites)
  • Sites in high-energy topic spaces (culture sites, fashion sites, music sites, porn sites)

Sites that maybe could benefit from a regular injection of quality content:

  • Informational sites (how-to sites, encyclopedic sites, data collections, historical sites, public domain arts & literature sites)
  • Non-profit membership-supported sites (clubs and organizations, large extended family groups, cause-related sites, political sites)
  • Sites based on repeat consumers of the same content (online games sites)

Sites that probably don’t need to worry about content once they’re up (although adding quality content can never hurt)

  • Local-only sites (restaurants, shops, professional service providers, health & medical services providers, legal service providers, personal services providers)
  • Single topic sites (individual person in-memorium sites, single-issue awareness sites, sites dedicated to permanent locations like historic architecture or unique geographic areas, specific item enthusiast sites like for a single model of classic automobile)
  • Sites not particularly concerned about search traffic (small family sites, advertising landing page sites, intranet-type sites)

If you are one of the last group, but you still want to add content, and you need help thinking of ideas, here ya go. You’re welcome.

  • Solicit reviews and recommendations from your clients and customers. Use attractive images to fill space and try to make as many pages as is reasonable.
  • Post articles on different ways to use your products or services.
  • Keep a blog related to your topic space. Don’t stress about daily posting, just try to put something up 3 or 4 times a month.
  • Post videos of people using your products or talking about your services. Definitely post video of any television presence such as commercial spots, or news program mentions.
  • Post HTML versions of any print product materials or brochures.
  • Post any and all press releases.
  • Put up a “Something of the month” section.
  • Publish a “Related resources” section and add a resource or two every month.
  • Watch for any news related to your product or service and post a brief synopsis along with your personal reaction.

And one last note: Always make sure you maintain a clear and usable organization when you start regularly adding content. If spiders can’t find and sort it, it helps you not.

Advertisements
03
Jun
11

Friday’s SEO Site of the Week

This week, we’re going back to the old Google mine for another bit of essential SEO. This one is vital to any web site that has a local component.

Google Places

If you don’t know already, Google Places is kind of like a Yellow Pages ad that shows up when someone searches [keyword] and/or [your industry] + [your location]. You’ve seen Google Places listings—they’re the results listings that show up next to a local map full of flags. And it doesn’t matter if your bizz is number one for your money  keyword, if you don’t show up in the Places listings, you’re still way down the page.

Places isn’t quite like regular search results. You have some control over what people see. You can open an account (usually associated with a Gmail account) and enter your business details just the way you want them. You can upload photos or videos. You can list hours of operation, specials, whatever.

The only catch to all this is you have to prove you are the rightful owner. So, you fill everything out, and submit, and Google says “Prove you are the owner.” They will either make an automatic phone call to your listed phone number with a PIN code, or if you prefer, they will mail the PIN in a postcard to your business address.

That’s all there is to it. It’s free. And if you want to do internet business locally, it is absolutely necessary.

We’ll give it some clicks.




Follow the Wizard!

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 2 other followers

April 2018
M T W T F S S
« Mar    
 1
2345678
9101112131415
16171819202122
23242526272829
30  
Blog Directory
Add blog to our directory.
Promote Your Blog
SEO Blog Directory
An intellectual property of . Most rights reserved.
Advertisements